Common Health Code Violations That Restaurants Could Face, And How To Avoid Them

For this reason, restauranteurs must ensure that their staff are properly trained in maintaining high standard of cleanliness and sanitation within the premises, as well as themselves, by providing staff with uniforms etc. Uniforms, especially such items as chef aprons and chef hats can prevent cross contamination of food, ensuring that they observe the highest possible standard when it comes to food preparation. However, in addition to clothing and cleanliness, there are many more aspects of restaurant operations that will fall under the purview of a health inspector, and it is the duty of both the management and staff to ensure that they adhere to these strict regulations.

So, what are some of the most common health code violations that restaurants face, and how can they avoid these?

Time and temperature – Time and temperature both play a vital role in keeping food fresh and safe. Different types of food should be stored under different temperatures, and for specific periods of time. Hence it is essential for all staff to be extra vigilant regarding these and to have good training on the right temperatures to store different food items. In the food preparation industry, there is a temperature danger zone, which is between 40o F and 140o F which is considered as the temperature in which bacteria grows. Hence when food is kept within this range for longer periods, the greater the chances that they may be unfit to be consumed. According to competent authorities, it is recommended that cold food not be kept at room temperature for more than two hours, and hot food for more than one hour. After this time there is a high likelihood that the food will be unsafe to eat.
Some ways to prevent your kitchen food entering this danger zone are to keep hot food at high temperatures of 140o F or above, by keeping them in chafing dishes, warming trays or slow cookers. Cold food should be kept below 40o F by storing them in containers and keeping them in ice. When reheating food or even defrosting, it should be done thoroughly and the internal temperature of the food checked. A temperature log book should always be maintained, and thermometers checked regularly for accuracy.

Food storage – Cross contamination of food can occur from poor storage habits. For example, cooked meats and raw meats should never be stored together, and food should be stored in proper air tight, labelled containers.
Proper care should be taken to store food at all times, and sufficient training given to staff on the same. Vegetables and fruits, cooked meats, raw meat etc should be stored in proper packaging or containers and on different levels or shelves, from top to bottom in the following order: raw vegetables, cooked vegetables, cooked meat, cooked seafood, raw seafood, raw beef, raw pork, raw chicken. Daily inspections should be carried out by the staff to ensure that proper storage methods are being followed.

Cross contamination – Bacteria can easily be transferred from one food item to another through mishandling. Touching one type of food such as meat, and then touching another type of food such as a vegetable, prior to cleaning the hands properly can contaminate food.
All staff who handle food should be given extensive training on food safety and handling. In addition, it is also recommended that kitchens use different colored cutting boards and knives for different food items, so that there is absolutely no chance of cross contamination of food. Proper hygiene methods and standards such as washing of hands should be strictly enforced and adhered to by everyone.

Personal hygiene – The importance of personal hygiene when it comes to those working in the food preparation industry can’t be stressed enough. Our bodies can carry around a large number of bacteria which is why restaurant kitchen staff should always shower before staring work as well as at the end of their work shift. Cross contamination of food can occur from clothing as well, since bacteria, fur, dirt and dust can transfer from clothing which has been worn outside, onto the food being prepared. In addition to these, bacteria could also transfer from hair, nails, skin etc encompassing the need for strict personal hygiene standards.
Uniforms should be provided for all staff working in a kitchen, so that they won’t need to wear there outside clothing while preparing food. Certain parts of the uniform such as chef hats, keep sweat and hair from contaminating food, and chef aprons will also be useful in maintaining a sanitary environment. Staff should be made to cut their hair short, or tie it back, keep their nails, fingers and hands clean at all times, and to maintain proper personal hygiene. Antibacterial soap should be kept available for them to use when needed, and should be refilled regularly.

Chemical use and storage – There is no doubt that chemicals are needed to keep the kitchen area clean and sanitized. Staff should be given proper training on how to use such chemicals and the best methods used for cleaning so that they maintain a very sanitized working environment, and are aware of the dangers that the chemicals offer.
Those who supply cleaning chemicals can provide good training for restaurant staff, and these should be done on a regular basis. In addition, staff should be trained in how to protect themselves when using such chemicals, and also how to store them properly, away from food service areas so that there is no contamination of food from these chemicals.

Every restaurant should ensure that they have set procedures and a proper cleaning and safety, and hygiene manuals done for reference by all staff. Sufficient training sessions should be conducted on a regular basis by the management and management should ensure that everyone adheres to these regulations at all times. Non adherence to food safety standards can mean dire consequences for the restaurant owners and could even result in the business being closed down.

Buying and Selling Automobile Dealerships – Axioms When Negotiating

Buying and Selling Automobile Dealerships – Axioms When Negotiating the Contract

No two negotiations are alike and in the art of negotiations there are no fixed responses; there are only basic rules that are to be adapted according to each circumstance and basic duties that formulate the boundaries of hyperbole. The basic duties when negotiating are discussed in another article. The basic rules of negotiating are as follows:

(1) Be prepared. Axiom 1: Do your homework.

(2) Identify your objective ahead of time and when you reach it, STOP. Many times I have seen lawyers that have won their cases keep talking until they have talked the judge into ruling for the other side. During negotiations, many dealers who have found what they were looking for, have lost the deal because they tried to sweeten-the-pot one too many times. Axiom 2: Pigs get fat and hogs get slaughtered.

(3) Always keep your objective in mind when negotiating and do not get sidetracked on meaningless issues. The negotiator is not at the negotiation table to win a debate or to teach someone a lesson. The most successful negotiator does not bicker. Axiom 3: Keep your eye on the doughnut and not the hole.

(4) Answer only what you are asked and only to the extent to which you are asked. Do not anticipate what the other side wants to know. You are not there to educate them, or to impress them with your knowledge. For example, if asked when you were born, you do not have to volunteer location and lineage. Axiom 4: It is usually what you say, not what you hear that hurts you.

(5) Do not volunteer to immediately relinquish any written documentation that you have researched and prepared, if the other side will settle for it being mailed at a later date. Axiom 5: If something was not originally written for publication, always re-read it with the idea of publication in mind before you release it. Axiom 5a: Don’t give away free information.

(6) Outline the other side’s position and concessions and have them initial the paper before leaving the negotiation session and give them a copy. Axiom 6: Faded ink is clearer than the sharpest memory.

(7) Do not feel pressured. There is nothing the other side can do to embarrass you into an agreement. Axiom 7: If you do make a mistake, 99.9% of the world will never know or care.

(8) Do not get emotional unless it is an act — and then, only get emotional if you have previously won an award for “Best Acting”. Axiom 8: The most skilled negotiator never loses control.

(9) Do not be afraid to be self-deprecating, if that’s what it takes to get the job done. There is an old story about the fur salesman who came to work one day, only to find that, during the night, the cat had peed on the furs. Later, when a customer was trying on a coat, she told the salesman that the coat smelled like pee. The salesman responded that it was not the coat she that smelled; but that a cat had peed on his jacket. Axiom 9: Sometimes you have to pee on yourself to get the job done.

(10) Every deal has key elements (such as the offer, acceptance, consideration, and time of performance), have your checklist and be sure to cover all of the elements. Do not walk away thinking you have an agreement when in fact you do not. Axiom 10: A sale is completed only after the check clears and the buyer has legal title to the assets.

(11) Do not lie. Axiom 11: It is better to say nothing, than to lie.

(12) Do not make concessions unless you have thought them through while away from the pressures of the negotiating table. There is nothing wrong with saying: “That sounds reasonable; let me check one thing.” or “That sounds reasonable, let’s take a break for a few minutes and mull it over.”

(13) No matter how ridiculous other party’s arguments may be, put your self in their shoes and walk them through. At best, you might find their arguments have some merit and at worse you will better understand what drives the other person.

(14) Always conduct yourself as a gentleman, or a lady. The loud mouth may dominate the conversation, but the gentleman or lady, controls it. Axiom 12: The most proficient negotiator is not the loud mouth.

(15) When negotiations are finished and you going home do not be tempted to pat yourself on the back; try to think of what you gave away. Axiom 13: Even a dunderhead gets lucky sometimes.

(16) There is nothing the other person can say which is binding without your consent. Axiom 14: if you hear something outrageous do not attack, negotiate.

(17) If you make someone want to do something for you, they will help you find a way.

(18) The “Real Buyer” calls nearly every day. The prospect that creates more than two unwarranted delays is probably not a real prospect. Axiom 15: Do not confuse sincerity with a “soft touch.”

(19) Negotiating with one prospect at a time is a mistake. Axiom 16: The first real buyer to the table with a contract and a check wins. Axiom 16a: The “real” buyer isn’t always the one with the highest bid.

(20) Real buyers have monetary limits on the amount of money they will commit to a deal. Axiom 17: People who say they have no monetary limit are almost always not serious buyers.

(21) To succeed, keep the initiative. Negotiation is a business, not a game. Axiom 18: Due diligence is a sign of professionalism, not of weakness.

(22) Be as careful near completion, as you were at the beginning. Axiom 19: Many a race was lost near the finish line.

(23) Take a break during the negotiations and re-read rules one through twenty-three.

Focusing on the Present

One of the largest hurdles for meditation for beginners is learning to focus on the here and now. To learn what it means to find the space to see the now, to see what it means to live in the moment. Most of us are entirely unable to to do this. We have a panel of judges who condemn us for past failures that only remotely resemble our current circumstances. Every time we listen to those inner critics we relive the past.

When beginning to learn meditation, the learner may suddenly believe that they cannot meditate because when they were a child they could not sit still and listen in school. This thought can continue to comparing themselves to that one kid who they believed was better than him, distracting themselves entirely from what they originally sought to do. The key to overcoming these critics is to let go of them. Realize that these critics bind us to a single opinion and outlook on life. Realize that we cannot truly see what is real because we put everything through a filter.

Believe that you can let them go and then take action. The next time these critics make their voices heard. It can be during meditation or as we live our lives, take account of them and ask, “Is this what is?” Often times we project ourselves, our insecurities, our arrogance onto others and situations and after a few moments consideration can see that as well. Then accept the present, notice all of it details without listening to the judgment.

As we strive to live fully in the present we become mindful. We become more at peace with what preconceive, with what is, and what we believe will happen. Once we can embrace the now, we can focus and concentrate with what we meditate on.