Common Health Code Violations That Restaurants Could Face, And How To Avoid Them

For this reason, restauranteurs must ensure that their staff are properly trained in maintaining high standard of cleanliness and sanitation within the premises, as well as themselves, by providing staff with uniforms etc. Uniforms, especially such items as chef aprons and chef hats can prevent cross contamination of food, ensuring that they observe the highest possible standard when it comes to food preparation. However, in addition to clothing and cleanliness, there are many more aspects of restaurant operations that will fall under the purview of a health inspector, and it is the duty of both the management and staff to ensure that they adhere to these strict regulations.

So, what are some of the most common health code violations that restaurants face, and how can they avoid these?

Time and temperature – Time and temperature both play a vital role in keeping food fresh and safe. Different types of food should be stored under different temperatures, and for specific periods of time. Hence it is essential for all staff to be extra vigilant regarding these and to have good training on the right temperatures to store different food items. In the food preparation industry, there is a temperature danger zone, which is between 40o F and 140o F which is considered as the temperature in which bacteria grows. Hence when food is kept within this range for longer periods, the greater the chances that they may be unfit to be consumed. According to competent authorities, it is recommended that cold food not be kept at room temperature for more than two hours, and hot food for more than one hour. After this time there is a high likelihood that the food will be unsafe to eat.
Some ways to prevent your kitchen food entering this danger zone are to keep hot food at high temperatures of 140o F or above, by keeping them in chafing dishes, warming trays or slow cookers. Cold food should be kept below 40o F by storing them in containers and keeping them in ice. When reheating food or even defrosting, it should be done thoroughly and the internal temperature of the food checked. A temperature log book should always be maintained, and thermometers checked regularly for accuracy.

Food storage – Cross contamination of food can occur from poor storage habits. For example, cooked meats and raw meats should never be stored together, and food should be stored in proper air tight, labelled containers.
Proper care should be taken to store food at all times, and sufficient training given to staff on the same. Vegetables and fruits, cooked meats, raw meat etc should be stored in proper packaging or containers and on different levels or shelves, from top to bottom in the following order: raw vegetables, cooked vegetables, cooked meat, cooked seafood, raw seafood, raw beef, raw pork, raw chicken. Daily inspections should be carried out by the staff to ensure that proper storage methods are being followed.

Cross contamination – Bacteria can easily be transferred from one food item to another through mishandling. Touching one type of food such as meat, and then touching another type of food such as a vegetable, prior to cleaning the hands properly can contaminate food.
All staff who handle food should be given extensive training on food safety and handling. In addition, it is also recommended that kitchens use different colored cutting boards and knives for different food items, so that there is absolutely no chance of cross contamination of food. Proper hygiene methods and standards such as washing of hands should be strictly enforced and adhered to by everyone.

Personal hygiene – The importance of personal hygiene when it comes to those working in the food preparation industry can’t be stressed enough. Our bodies can carry around a large number of bacteria which is why restaurant kitchen staff should always shower before staring work as well as at the end of their work shift. Cross contamination of food can occur from clothing as well, since bacteria, fur, dirt and dust can transfer from clothing which has been worn outside, onto the food being prepared. In addition to these, bacteria could also transfer from hair, nails, skin etc encompassing the need for strict personal hygiene standards.
Uniforms should be provided for all staff working in a kitchen, so that they won’t need to wear there outside clothing while preparing food. Certain parts of the uniform such as chef hats, keep sweat and hair from contaminating food, and chef aprons will also be useful in maintaining a sanitary environment. Staff should be made to cut their hair short, or tie it back, keep their nails, fingers and hands clean at all times, and to maintain proper personal hygiene. Antibacterial soap should be kept available for them to use when needed, and should be refilled regularly.

Chemical use and storage – There is no doubt that chemicals are needed to keep the kitchen area clean and sanitized. Staff should be given proper training on how to use such chemicals and the best methods used for cleaning so that they maintain a very sanitized working environment, and are aware of the dangers that the chemicals offer.
Those who supply cleaning chemicals can provide good training for restaurant staff, and these should be done on a regular basis. In addition, staff should be trained in how to protect themselves when using such chemicals, and also how to store them properly, away from food service areas so that there is no contamination of food from these chemicals.

Every restaurant should ensure that they have set procedures and a proper cleaning and safety, and hygiene manuals done for reference by all staff. Sufficient training sessions should be conducted on a regular basis by the management and management should ensure that everyone adheres to these regulations at all times. Non adherence to food safety standards can mean dire consequences for the restaurant owners and could even result in the business being closed down.

Valentine’s Day Presents – What Not to Give Her on Valentine’s Day

Guys, you most likely viewed hundreds of Hollywood flicks where the star, stud actor attempts to “woo” the women by showering the woman with presents, flowers, as well as chocolates…and in the majority of films, this succeeds. However do women actually want these kind of things? Particularly on Valentines Day? Maybe or maybe not.

Exhibiting kindness as well as compassion can often be great…and in most cases, girls may be grateful for it. However, does this approach generate sexual attraction? Or does it leave you out of her mind and heart? Actually, it depends upon WHEN it’s being put into use…as well as in exactly what context, of course! Desirable women receive compliments and presents from guys all around them.

Believe me, they do. They’ve got guys attempting to please them constantly…on a daily basis…provided they are physically desirable. Of course, she may well like this, however it isn’t really what she Actually desires…She basically merely hopes to catch the recognition of high-valued men!

Here’s a simple fact: Real high valued guys won’t ever attempt to win over women with just Things. No – women need to impress HIM before anything else before he will ever give in to gift giving! Without a doubt, attractive girls LOVE it once they EARN a man’s charity.

So precisely WHEN do you need to offer a girl flowers and chocolates? Once you have created the ample degree of attraction, naturally! Do you think a $12 box of chocolates will get her to be attracted to you?

Plan to Create the WOW Factor with your Speech or Presentation

“Wow, what a fabulous presentation!” they said as they stood up after your speech. “Wow,” they said as they mingled after the event.

You, yes, you… WILL produce an impact.

What will it be?

Can you make it a “wow”?

Of course you can.

And the first step is to understand that it is not a mystery. It is something that you create. “Wow” is not an accidental by-product of a presentation. You create it deliberately.

The first thing to do is to define what it is that you want to create. What exactly is that “wow”? In other words, you need to define:

How will your audience respond to your speech or presentation?

What will they take away with them and remember?
What will they remember of you?

Why will they think “Wow what a fabulous presentation!”?

Start by defining the purpose of your presentation or speech. What do you want its impact to be?

You need to articulate whether you want to inform, persuade, inspire, motivate, entertain, shock… You may even want to do several of these things – in different parts of your presentation. But they must not be left to chance or you risk creating “Ho-hum… ” rather than “wow!”

Then define the message; the central message of your presentation – what one thing do you want the audience to take away? This message can be called a thesis statement or a theme. It can be given a number of names, but you need to be able to state it in one sentence. That way you will stay focused on that outcome when you are planning

When you have those two things articulated, the things you want people to remember, the impact you want to make; then you can create the structure and the language of your presentation to support them. The whole speech can be organised to reinforce that impact and that message.

The second of the questions was “What do I want them to remember of me?”

Who are you? How will you be remembered after this presentation? Are you professional, poised, articulate? Are you warm, folksy, creative, nurturing? Maybe you want to be seen as ballistic, confronting, no-nonsense, boot camp material. What message will your clothes and your grooming convey? What will your choice of language say about you?

You cannot be someone you are not, when you present, unless you are prepared to be a performer for the entire production. Insincerity will detract from your speech as quickly as a joke in bad taste. But you can present a side of yourself as the highlight – the side you want your audience to remember.

And the most powerful choice you will make is how you get that image to support your message – how you put the two together.

It may be totally supportive, in that the image is unobtrusive; seamlessly part of the message and the complete package – an incredibly effective combination.

Or you may choose to create an edge, a mystique.

Your body language, your facial expression and gestures, your clothes and your grooming all need to work towards the impact you choose to make. And they will contribute as powerfully to the impact you choose to make as a person as they do to the impact you choose for your presentation to make.

This package, this combination of impact, message and image are what people take away from your presentation. They are the wow you create.

But the pivotal word, there, was “choose” – the impact you choose to make, the impact you choose for your presentation to make.

Whatever you may be trying to achieve, don’t let the impact of your presentation be an accident. Right from the beginning, it needs to be part of the planning. When you are visualizing your production, toying with ideas and possibilities and first drafts, make the impact of you as a person and of your performance an integral part of that process. Visualise it and work it into all aspects of your production planning.

Then you have the foundation for creating the “wow” factor.