Impact Presentations for Board Rooms Considered

If you are going to give a presentation to the corporate board of a large company, you have to understand that they’ve already seen many presentations in their career, probably hundreds of them. They’re not going to be easily swayed by tricky lighting, or over-the-top power point presentations. They want facts, they want the reality, and they want you to answer every one of their questions to their liking.

If you fail to answer one of their questions you are doomed, and even if you answer the question, but you didn’t answer it correctly or you misinterpreted it, you will find yourself the brunt of their frustrations, and that could be a deal killer. The tone of your presentation and the tempo are very important, yes it’s important to dress nice, have professional literature, and be clear and concise with your presentation, but there’s more to it than that.

If you have the best product in the world, and you can prove it, even a boring presentation may get more play than a flashy presentation with no substance. However, if you can have the best of both worlds, that is to say an incredible impact presentation, along with a group of incredible folks with an abundance of industry knowledge, you can get to the heart of their questions, and answer them without missing a beat. Indeed if you can’t do this, you shouldn’t be there.

Put yourself in their shoes, if you had to listen to hundreds of presentations over the course of the last five years, would you want to listen to BS, monotone speech, or anyone who couldn’t answer your question? Patience may be a virtue in your church, and in your family life, but it isn’t in the high powered world of corporate boards.

Every question matters and everyone in that room’s opinion matters. So bring on the high-impact presentation, but don’t be na├»ve into thinking that you can come unprepared. You have to be on your best day, and you had better know what are talking about. Please consider all this.

Focusing on the Present

One of the largest hurdles for meditation for beginners is learning to focus on the here and now. To learn what it means to find the space to see the now, to see what it means to live in the moment. Most of us are entirely unable to to do this. We have a panel of judges who condemn us for past failures that only remotely resemble our current circumstances. Every time we listen to those inner critics we relive the past.

When beginning to learn meditation, the learner may suddenly believe that they cannot meditate because when they were a child they could not sit still and listen in school. This thought can continue to comparing themselves to that one kid who they believed was better than him, distracting themselves entirely from what they originally sought to do. The key to overcoming these critics is to let go of them. Realize that these critics bind us to a single opinion and outlook on life. Realize that we cannot truly see what is real because we put everything through a filter.

Believe that you can let them go and then take action. The next time these critics make their voices heard. It can be during meditation or as we live our lives, take account of them and ask, “Is this what is?” Often times we project ourselves, our insecurities, our arrogance onto others and situations and after a few moments consideration can see that as well. Then accept the present, notice all of it details without listening to the judgment.

As we strive to live fully in the present we become mindful. We become more at peace with what preconceive, with what is, and what we believe will happen. Once we can embrace the now, we can focus and concentrate with what we meditate on.

Presentation Essentials – 6 Tips to Success

One of the most powerful skills in today’s business world is the ability to deliver effective presentations. Few of us are born with the raw natural talent to be great presenters. For most of us, it requires practice, coaching, and hard work to master a skill which can be intimidating and frightening. At a time when it seems there is an aversion to PowerPoint presentations, there will always be a need or requirement for career-minded individuals to be competent and comfortable speaking and presenting in front of audiences – in person or online and to employees, colleagues, or clients. Here are 6 tips to success from a career of delivering more than 300 presentations.

1 Start with the end in mind

One of the most difficult steps in delivering effective presentations is the development of the presentation itself. We often struggle organizing a presentation so it delivers the messages you want, is well organized and flows nicely, and is visually appealing (if using visual aids). Start with end in mind. Identify 3-5 key messages you want the audience to remember. Once you have your messages, build your presentation around those messages. Create an outline for your presentation and fill in the blanks – introduction, body and content, value proposition of very most important takeaway message, and closing.

2 Keep it simple

We hear it often – keep it simple. I recall preparing a presentation for a CEO in the Middle East about 5 years ago. I worked on it for about a week and went into the meeting ready to deliver about a 45 minute presentation. Before I started, the CEO turned to me and said “I have about 15 minutes so please just hit the highlights of what you are proposing and how it will solve our issues.” This was a great reminder of how most of us our today – busy and overloaded with information. I improvised and shortened a 45- minute presentation into about 12 minutes. Always be ready to deliver an “executive summary” of your presentation if needed.

3 Use graphics and pictures

Using graphics and pictures in a presentation can be powerful. Use simple but attractive graphics to tell a story or convey and support a message. Use pictures to show your experience or an example. Graphics tend to trump bullet points and text every time.

4 Practice your presentation

There is no better substitute than practicing. Whether you are using visual aids or just standing in front of a podium, practice, practice, practice. You should rehearse in front of a mirror or in front of other colleagues (when possible) at least 3-4 times before delivering the presentation. Be open to feedback. Sometimes we can’t see what others see in us or we don’t realize we are doing something annoying like putting our hands in our pockets and jingling coins. Never try to “wing” a presentation. Be ready when it counts.

5 Bring energy and enthusiasm

Audiences and clients are perceptive. You need every edge you can get when competing against others for projects or competitions. Look like you want to be there by showing some excitement and enthusiasm. There is a fine line here with not over-selling or going out of character. Be yourself, be calm, confident, and make the audience feel you want to be there and you are enjoying it.

6 Nail your opening and closing

Leave nothing to chance, nail your opening and closing. You should practice and know the first 25-35 words you are going to open with, exactly. You should also know how you are going to close and summarize, precisely. Both of these are opportunities to capture the audience and then confirm you delivered a winning presentation!

Gary L. Miller lives in Tokyo, Japan and is the founder of http://logosreadyonline.com